16 – Bloody May: Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh

Faerie of traditional Celtic Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and sometimes bloodthirsty.

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It is long known the Good People are more active in the month of May. Until they tell us themselves, we can only speculate why this is so but… we are wise to be wary, for not all Faerie wish to act as Guardian, or Muse, or kindly foretell a death at any time.

And in the month of May, there are those who would gladly steal your blood or even your life.

We look at 2 tales of encounters with Faerie in the month of May which show us how easily they are tempted by a lovely lady and how swift, and final, is their reckoning when a promise is broken. The line twixt life and death is fine indeed…

This episode features 3 particularly dangerous Faerie: the Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh.

These are three fellas you do not want to bump into at any time, but in the month of May,

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that bump would surely turn deadly. But fear not, we have some tips on how you might save yourself from their wicked whimsies.

Kitty reminds you not to be tempted to go Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

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Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo

Additional Music: ‘Caoineadh Cu Chulainn’ written by Bill Whelan from the album ‘Riverdance’, 1997. Performed by Davy Spillane.

‘Sweet Little Lullaby’ by Darren Curtis. From Royalty Free Zone.
‘Ghost’ by Tim Beek. From Royalty Free Zone.

Anecdote collected by Scottish author John Francis Campbell in 1862. Read by Zornaph. http://www.fiverr.com/zornaph/

Poem ‘Will o’Wisp’, published in Scottish Broadsheet in 1869. Read by Greyolltwit.
Tale ‘The Fairy Rath’, collected by Lady Wilde in 1887. Read by Greyolltwit.

Additional Music: ‘Raggle Taggle Gyspy’ performed by Plantxy. Live at Vicar Street, 2004.

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